Postcard from Arizona- 11

7 Dec 2017
Benson, AZ

It was inevitable. We whined from the first of May thru the first week of December about how hot it was. Now we’re faced with freezing temps (~25° F) tomorrow morning. It’s about to go from sweltering heat to the dead of winter overnight. Ahhh… life in the desert!

Or maybe the rapid transition has to do with Pearl Harbor Day, the anniversary of which we recall today. The Admiral was born in Honolulu, Hawaii just under 4 months before they bombed the the Navy base there. Her dad, Frances (Frank), was in the Navy and was home with the family that morning when the bombing started. He headed back to Pearl Harbor with other sailors from the neighborhood and went to work. This is a photo of his ship, the USS Oglala; USS Oglala has the dubious distinction of being the first Navy ship sunk during the attack of Sunday, 7 Dec 1941. The caption tells part of the tale of its distinguished service with the US Navy from 1906 to 1965!

1280px-USS_Oglala_(CM-4)_capsized_at_Pearl_Harbor_1941

USS Oglala– Built in 1906 for the passenger service (New York/Boston/Portland) and christened SS Massachusetts, she was renamed a month later as SS Shawmut. In 1917 she was purchased by the US Navy and fitted out to be a mine layer. She was designated CM-4, USS Shawmut. In 1928 she was again renamed to avoid phonetic confusion with USS Chaumont and became the USS Oglala, named after the Oglala tribe of the Lokota Sioux Nation in South Dakota. After capsizing on 7 Dec, Oglala was refloated, repaired & refitted as an engine repair ship and completed the war mostly in the SW Pacific. Decommissioned in Jan 1946, she was mothballed in Siusun Bay till sold for scrap in mid-1965.

Frank survived that day and many more after that, but thanks to him being in the Navy, the Admiral and her mom were sent packing to the mainland. Never mind her family were all born and lived on Maui and Oahu since the late 1800s, Navy logic dictated that all civilian families of Navy personnel be evacuated. When the Admiral turned 6 months old she went from warm sunny days on Oahu to the dead of winter in Utah arriving in sub-zero temps. Vaguely like our transition into winter from the seemingly endless summer of SE Arizona!

You wouldn’t think a nearly new Arctic Fox would be a ‘fixer upper’, but that’s kind of what has happened. I mentioned before that I found the trailer brakes weren’t working. Instead of having them repaired I ordered replacement disc brakes through Performance Trailer Brakes (PTB) in Norman, OK. It took months to get thru their queue, but in early November Dennis Hageman of PTB arrived here in the park to do the work. From when he arrived at the nearby rented site and started working till we pulled back in after the post-installation test ride, it was less than 7 hrs. And that included the time to install after-market equalizers from MORryde. I’m very happy with our experience working with PTB. It was about $2,650 for parts and labor for the brakes plus another $300 for the MORryde SRE4000 equalizers.

So why were the trailer’s drum brakes not working? The axles on our Fox are from AL-KO/Dexter and have been fitted with the Ez-Lube feature. Ez-Lube is basically a system of drilled passages in the axle ends; the ends are machined to carry the wheel bearings and the adjusting nut for setting the bearing pre-load. The drilled passages are intended to duct bearing grease from a Zerk fitting in the center of the axle end out to the wheel bearings. Makes it so any fool can lube a bearing and, sure enough, some fool (no, not your scribe this time!) squeezed enough lubricant into the bearings that it leaked out past the seal into the brake drums.

Dennis had an interesting explanation of what is going on. It seems the hole from the central passageway exits at a poorly chosen location which allows some lubricant to go between the bearings (that’s a good thing), but also some leaks out at the inside bearing seal (that’s not a good thing). Oops! PTB notified AL-KO/Dexter but there’s been no feedback yet.

Wheel bearings have a lubrication interval of perhaps 30,000 miles whether or not you have the Ez-Lube feature. Ez-Lube is supposed to simplify the lubrication process; in no way does it affect the lubrication interval. However the presence of the Zerk fitting causes owners to feel like they should give it a squirt every once in awhile ‘just in case’. The result is brake damage. Our brakes were probably lubed at the factory, then possibly lubed again when the trailer arrived in La Mesa, AZ. For good measure they may have gotten more grease when we took delivery of the trailer in June 2015 since it had been sitting around for over a year at that point. That’s possibly 3 times the bearings were lubed in either 0 miles or about 1,000 miles, depending on whether or not it arrived in Arizona from Le Grande, Oregon on its own wheels.

I wasn’t planning on the equalizer replacement, but when I looked at what it was I realized it would probably make an improvement in the hard ride our Fox seems to have. Like some other components from MORryde, the SRE4000 involves the generous use of an elastomer (synthetic rubber) which I hope will soften some of the road shocks sent from the axles up thru the leaf springs & shock absorbers into the frame of the trailer. Here’s a YouTube video of what’s going on with the equalizer when moving on a rough road. Btw, the old equalizer was a solid piece of 1/2″ thick steel.

On the plus side, I learned our Fox was delivered with heavy duty spring shackles (1/2″ thick instead of 1/4″ thick) and that the shackle bolts are wet bolts, i.e. they can be lubricated without removing the bolts (yes, another opportunity for over-use of lubricant!).

The Admiral has a green thumb and this past summer she launched into a full scale truck farm. Well, maybe a slight exaggeration but not by a lot. Ever heard of Earth Boxes? We now have 5 of them on roll-around stands plus various and sundry pots and containers that have everything from broccoli, kale and chard to marigolds and geraniums. They’re pretty cool because you add water thru a fill tube into the bottom of the container, then the water wicks up through the soil to the root area. A cover over the top surface (with holes for the plants) minimizes surface evaporation.

The bottom line? Tomatoes were a bust; the greens didn’t really get going till after we got below the 90° F level, but they’re doing pretty good right now. Well… that was before the freeze that’s engulfing us as I type this. Squash was a winner all summer. The broccoli did nothing till about 3 weeks ago- nothing like what you see in the stores but tasty. Basil was the big producer. And the folks at our favorite restaurant (Mi Casa) use it, so she’s had a home for all the excess. She uses it to make an all-veggie pesto for our pasta. Flowers always grow, and so too do the various worms and caterpillars that her Earth Boxes have been nourishing. I can’t believe some of the critters she’s picked off the goodies! This was a very big year for butterflies and I can’t help wonder how many more we might have seen but for the Admiral! 🙂

Annie and Kelly continue to do well. Annie turns 11 on 24 Dec and Kelly does the same on 3 July 2018.

About bruce10b

An RVer, on the road full time and wintering in Benson, AZ.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s